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Publications

Abu-Nimer

Interfaith Dialogue

  1. Peace-Building By, Between and Beyond Muslims and Evangelical Christians, Mohammed Abu-Nimer and David Augsburger, eds. (New York: Lexington, 2009).
  2. Unity in Diversity: Interfaith Dialogue in the Middle East.  Mohammed Abu-Nimer, Amal Khoury, and Emily Welty, Washington DC: USIP, 2007.
  3. Interfaith Dialogue: A Guide For Muslims. (with Muhammad Shafiq) Herendon, Virginia: International Institute for Islamic Thought (IIT), 2007.
  4. “Religion, Dialogue, and Nonviolence Actions in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society Vol. 17, No. 3 (Spring 2004).
  5. “Conflict Resolution, Culture, and Religion: Toward a Training Model of Interreligious Peacebuilding.” Journal of Peace Research, 38. 6 (Nov. 2001): 685-704.
  6. “Interfaith Dialogue: Are You a Believer.”  In Masarat, Iraq (Arabic). (translated and revised based on David Smock Book 2002). 2010.
  7. “The Role of Religious Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies: From Withdrawal to Forgiveness.” Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies. In Barry Hart (Ed). New York: University Press of America, 2008.  (p.239-261).
  8. “The Miracles of Transformation through Interfaith Dialogue: Are you a Believer?” in: Interfaith Dialogue. (Ed)  David Smock. Washington DC.: USIP, 2002.
  9. A guide for Interfaith Dialogue (Arabic). Abu-Nimer (With CEOSS Facilitators). Egypt: CEOSS, 2008.
  10. Strategic Assessment for Muslim Peace Secretary. Sri Lanka, September 2007.
  11. Interfaith Dialogue: A Guide For Muslims (With Dr. Muhammad Shafiq), Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue (CISD) Salam: Peace and Justice Institute, Nov. 2006 .
  12. Muslim-Christian Conversations For Peace. Fuller Theological Seminary & Salam Institute of Peace and Justice. David Augsburger and Mohammed Abu-Nimer. August 2006.
  13. Forum for Intercultural Dialogue in Egypt: A Five Years Assessment. A Report compiled for CEOSS (Coptic Evangelical Social Service), 2006.
  14. Role of Religion in Peace Processes: Christian and Muslim Interfaith and Peacebuilding Organizations in Balkan and Great Lakes. (With Ayse Kadayfci and Tsjard) report presented to Netherlands Foreign Ministry and Clingendale Institute). January, 2006.
  15. Muslim Peace and Interfaith organizations in Balkan and Great Lakes: An Assessment. (with Ayse Kadayfci) Prsented to Netherlands Foreign Ministry and Clingendale Institute. November, 2005.
  16. Interfaith Peacebuilding Guide. A Training Manual sponsored by URI: United Religious Initiative. 2004 (with Claudia Leibler, Barbara Hartford, and Susana McIIwaine Cynthia Sampson .www.uri.org) “Interfaith Dialogue in Israel-Palestine: Why It matters.” In: Waging Peace A Two-Part Discussion of Religion-Based Peacemaking. National Cathedral and USIP. 2003.
  17. “Muslim, Christian, and Jewish Youth Summer Camp.” A Report on including Muslim youth in interreligious summer camp, for E Pluribus Unum Project, 1999.
  18. “Islam and the West: can interfaith dialogue perform a miracle?”, Al Arab Online February 21, 2006; Search For Common Ground News, February,14, 2006.
  19. “Interfaith Dialogue in the Middle East: where do we go from here?” World Association for Al-Azhar Graduates. Cairo, June 27, 2009
  20. “Interfaith Dialogue in Israel-Palestine.” Conference on Religious Leaders and Conflict Management: Between Terror and Tolerance. Sponsored by University of Denver at Vail, Colorado. April 16-18. 2008.
  21. “Interfaith Peacebuilding in Israel-Palestine: From Sacred to Political.” International Studies Association (ISA). Hawaii, March 4, 2005.
  22. “Integrating Conflict Resolution & Diversity Approaches: A Training Model for Intercultural & Interreligious Peacebuilding.” Mohammed Abu-Nimer and Vernie Davis. NCPCR, June 2001.
  23. “Peacebuilding in Islamic Context.” National Conference on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution, Phoenix, Ariz., May 1999.
  24. “Religion and Peacebuilding.” In: Handbook on Peacebuilding (Ed.) Roger Mac Ginty. New York: Routledge, 2013.
  25. “So You Want to Be an Interfaith Peacebuilder?” The Interfaith Observer, December 2013 Issue.

 

Islamic Peace Building

 

  1. Peace-Building By, Between and Beyond Muslims and Evangelical Christians, Mohammed Abu-Nimer and David Augsburger, eds. (New York: Lexington, 2009).
  2. Nonviolence and Peacebuilding in Islamic: Theory and Practice. Gainesville, FL.: University Press of Florida, 2003.
  3. Muslim Peace Building Actors in Africa and the Balkans, Abu-Nimer, Mohammed and Ayse Kadayifci, Peace and Change: A Journal of Peace Research, vol. 33, no. 4, October, 2008.
  4. “Religious Contribution to Dialogue and Nonviolence Actions in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Possibilities and Obstacles.” Palestinian Society and History Review. Vol. 2. Spring 2007 (Arabic).
  5. “Religion, Dialogue, and Nonviolence Actions in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society Vol. 17, No. 3 (Spring 2004).
  6. “A Framework for Nonviolence and Peacebuilding in Islam.” Journal of Law and Religion. (Vol. 15 nos.1 and 2, 2001).
  7. “Conflict Resolution and Islam: Some Conceptual Questions”. Peace and Change, Vol. 21, January, 1996 (22-40).
  8. “Conflict Resolution Approaches: Western and Middle Eastern Lessons and Possibilities.” American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Vol. 55, No. 1. January,1996 (pp.35-52).
  9. “Peacebuilding.” In Stanley M. Burgess, Ph.D. and Michael D. Palmer (Eds.) Blackwell Companion to Religion and Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK (Forthcoming 2010).
  10. “Islamic Resources of Peacebuilding: Achievements and Challenges” With Ihsan Yilmaz. In: Islam and Peacebuilding: Gulen Movement initiative. By: John Esposito and Ihsan Yilmaz (Eds.) Istanbul: Blue Dome Press, 2010.
  11. “Islamic Model of Conflict Resolution: Principles and Challenges”. (Ed.): The Crescent and Dove: Critical Perspectives on Peace and Conflict Resolution in Islam. Washington DC: USIP, 2010.
  12. Modern Islamic Thought: Dynamic, Not Static. (Eds.) Said Abdul Aziz, Mohammed Abu-Nimer, and Meena Sharify-Funk. New York. Routledge Press. 2006.
  13. “Alternatives to War and Violence: An Islamic Perspective” With Jamal Badawi. In Michael Nagler. Peace Movements World Wide: New York: Praeger . 2010.
  14. “Islamic Principles of Nonviolent and Peace Building: A Framework” is reprinted with permission. In Dan Brumberg and Dina Shehata (eds.). Conflict, Identity, and Reform in the Muslim World: Challenges for U.S. Engagement . USIP. 2009.
  15. “Islamic Model of Conflict Resolution: Principles and Challenges”. (Ed): The Crescent and Dove: Critical Perspectives on Peace and Conflict Resolution in Islam. Washington DC: USIP, 2010.
  16. “The Role of Religious Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies: From Withdrawal to Forgiveness.” Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies. In Barry Hart (Ed). New York: University Press of America, 2008. (p.239-261)
  17. “Peace Education in a Bilingual and Bi-ethnic School for Palestinians and Jews in Israel: Lessons and Challenges” Ilham Nasser and Mohammed Abu-Nimer . In: Educational Response to Conflict: Systemic issues. Edited by Zvi Bekerman and Claire McGlynn Palgrave Mcmillan, 2007.
  18. “Contrasts in Conflict Management in Cleveland and Palestine.” Traditional Cures For Modern Conflicts: African Conflict “Medicine”. William Zartman (ed.), Boulder, CO.: Lynne Rienners, 2000.
  19. Final Evaluation Repot Evaluation of Madrasa Training in Pakistan. The International Center of Religion and Diplomacy. August 18, 2008.
  20. Principles and strategies of Peacebuilding Training. In Leadership and Building state Capacity: Combining the skills of Diplomats and Trainers. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholar. Washington DC. 2006.
  21. Muslim Peace and Interfaith organizations in Balkan and Great Lakes: An Assessment. (with Ayse Kadayfci) Prsented to Netherlands Foreign Ministry and Clingendale Institute. November, 2005.
  22. “Peacebuilding and Justice in Islamic Context.” A special paper for Catholic Relief Services, 1999.
  23. “Islam and the West: can interfaith dialogue perform a miracle?”, Al Arab Online February 21, 2006; Search For Common Ground News, February,14, 2006.
  24. “Viewpoint: Let go of CPT peace workers in Iraq!” Middle East Times. December 9, 2005; Al Quds Newspaper. December 10, 2005. Al-Hayat Newspaper, 12, 10, 2005.
  25. “Speak and act before it is too late.” Appeared in Alhayat 12/5/2005); Associate Press; Middle East Times, (12/9/2005 and 12/15/2005); Al Quds Newspaper (12/12/2005); Search For Common Ground News.
  26. “Nonviolence Values and Principles in Islam.” Fellowship Reconciliation Magazine, September October, 2004.
  27. “Nonviolence is in Sync with Islam” Al-Hayat newspaper (Arabic and English). August 29, 2003. (Also Middle East Times, Sept. 5, 2003).
  28. “Islamic Principles and Values of Peacemaking” Cantilevers, Vol. 7, Winter 1999-2000.
  29. “Islamic Approaches to Dialogue: Challenges and Possibilities.” (with Muhammad Sahfiq). Annual Conference of AMSS (Association of Muslim Scientist of North America. University of Maryland, October 27-28, 2007.
  30. “Islamic Model of Conflict Resolution: Principles And Challenges.” Conference on: Islamic Reform Relating to Conflict and Peace. USIP, Carter Hall, VA, August 2006.
  31. “Islam, Democracy and Conflict Resolution.” A paper presented at Islamic Synthesis Conference. Alexandria, Egypt. October 2003.
  32. “Islamic Source of Nonviolence and Peace. George Mason University. ICAR. Doctoral Alumni Conference. Sept 2002.
  33. “Islam, Non-violence, and Pacifism.” Religious Traditions of Pacifism in Times of War. New York. The Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. New York. Oct 2002.
  34. “Peacebuilding in Islam: Challenges and Potential.” A paper presented at MSSA (Muslim Social Science Association) Annual Conference, Georgetown, DC, October 2000.
  35. “Islam and Nonviolence: A Practitioner Perspective.” Conference on Islam and Nonviolence, sponsored by the Peace and Conflict Resolution Program and Nonviolence International Center at American University, Washington, DC, 1997.
  36. “Conflict Resolution and Islam: Some Conceptual Questions.” Fundamentalism Project Conference, sponsored by the American Academy of Art and Science, Washington, DC, February 1993 (invited and used to publish a working paper on the subject).
  37. “Forgiveness in the Arab and Islamic Contexts: Between Theology and Practice.” Journal of Religious Ethics, 2013. 41,(3). 474-494.
  38. “Peace-building, Development and the Realization of Human Rights.” ,Ernst Strüngmann Forum on “Formative Childhoods: A Pathway to Peace?” Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), (October 13-19, 2013)
  39. Islamic approaches to peacebuilding: An Emerging Conceptual framework . Humanitarianism and Conflict Response Institute.Manchester University. UK. January 24, 2013.
  40. ” Improving the Quality of Islamic Education in Developing Countries: Innovative Approaching”, Amr Abdalla, Muhammed, Abu-Nimer, Ilham Nasser, Aysa Kadayific, Lynn Kunkle, Saber el-Kilani: Creative Associates International,2006.
    https://www.academia.edu/8634418/Improving_the_Quality_of_Islamic_Education_in_Developing_Countries_Innovative_Approaches
  41. ” Peace Education: Islamic Prospectives: Curriculum /Teaching Module, Amr Abdalla, Narinder Kakar, Sara Saeed Khan Niazi, University of Peace,2009.
    https://www.academia.edu/9594825/Peace_Education_Islamic_Perspectives_2009_

 

Israel-Palestine

 

  1. Traditions and Transitions in Israel Studies: (Books on Israel, Volume 6), edited by Laura Zittrain Eisenberg, Neil Caplan, Naomi B. Sokoloff and Mohammed Abu-Nimer. 2002.
  2. Dialogue, Conflict Resolution and Change: Arab-Jewish Encounters in Israel, SUNY Press, Spring 1999.
  3. “Religion, Dialogue, and Nonviolence Actions in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society Vol. 17, No. 3 (Spring 2004).
  4. “Change Through Dialogue: The Case of Arab-Jewish Encounters in Israel.” Journal of Social Issues (Special Issue on: Improving Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel: Theory and Practice in Coexistence Education Programs, 60 (2) 2004.
  5. “Israeli-Palestinian Dialogue in the Second Intifada: between Despair and Hope.” Global Dialogue. vol. 4, no. 3, summer 2002, 130-1143.
  6. “Peace-Building in Postsettlement: Challenges for Israeli and Palestinian Peace Education. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, Vol. 6 No. 1, 2000 (1-21).
  7. “Conflict Resolution Training in The Middle East: Lessons To Be Learned. International Negotiation: A Journal of Theory and Practice, Special Issue on International Training of Conflict Resolution, 3:99-116, 1998.
  8. “Peace and Coexistence Programs in the Israeli-Palestine and Middle East context: Critical Lessons.” In: Dan Chistie The Encyclopedia of Peace Psychology. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
  9. “Religious Leaders and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: A Perspective.” For an edited book on: Religious Leaders and Conflict Management in Deeply Divided Societies: Between Terror and Tolerance. By Tim Sisk. 2010.
  10. “Peace Building and Nonviolent Political Movements in Arab-Muslim Communities: A Case Study of the Palestinian Intifada” The chapter is translated into German. By: Reinhard Treu. Graswurzelrevolution Publication. 2009.
  11. “The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. ” (With Simona Sharoni). In: Understanding the Contemporary Middle East, 3nd edition, Ed. Jillian Schwedler, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Press, 2008.
  12. “The Peacebuilder’s Paradox and the Dynamics of Dialogue: Psychosocial Approaches to Israeli/Palestinian Peacebuilding.” Mohammed Abu Nimer and Ned Lazarus. In: “Beyond Bullets and Bombs: Grassroots Peacebuilding between Palestinians and Israelis.. J. Kuriansky ed. Greenwood Press, 2007.
  13. “Nonviolent Action in Israel and Palestine: A Growing Force.” In: Bridging the Divide: Peacebuilding in Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. (Eds.). Edy Kaufman, Walid Salem, and Juliette Verhoeven. New York: Lynne Rienner, 2006. (Also Translated into Italian)
  14. “We Make Friends with Our Enemies.” Yale Israel Journal, Special Issue on Israel Palestine Elections, 2006.
  15. “September 11 and the Palestinian Reaction: No Win.” (With Amal Khoury) In Multiple Voices. Notre Dame University. Scott Appleby and Abdul Rasheid Omar (Forthcoming).
  16. “Reconciliation and Justice in Arab-Jewish Dialogue in Israel: Potential and Challenges”. Reconciliation, Justice, and Coexistence: Theory and Practice. Mohammed Abu-Nimer (Ed.) New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001.
  17. “Dialogue and National Consensus: Israeli and Palestinian Peace Activists Pre-Madrid Conference: Dilemmas of Israeli and Palestinian Peace Activists.” Books on Israel, K. Avruch (Ed.), New York: SUNY Press, 1997.
  18. “Conflict Resolution Between Arabs and Jews in Israel: A Case of Change and Control.” in Education in Divided Societies (Ed.) Peter Lemish, Haifa, Israel, 1996.
  19. Arab Jewish public Library Project: An Evaluation Report. Doroub Center for Leadership and training Galilee, Israel. November, 2005. (with Ilham Nasser).
  20. Neve Shalom/Wahat Al Salam, School for Peace: An Evaluation Report on Bilingual Education and Peace, 1994-2004) (A Grant administered by Center for Global Peace-SIS, AU), 2005.
  21. Ten Years of Seeds of Peace: An Evaluation Report (1993-2005). (Social Impact Washington DC. 2005).
  22. “We the Peacemakers: Teach-In to Congress for Middle East Peace.” In Tikkon Magazine: A critique of Politics, Culture, and Society. July/August 2004.
  23. “Tolerance and Pluralism in Palestinian School Text Books.” A report for Israeli Palestinian Center for Research and Information (IPCRI). 2003. (With Salem Awaies).
  24. “Non-Western Approaches to Conflict Resolution: Lessons from A Workshop in Gaza.” COPRED Peace Chronicle, Vol. 20, NO. 1, March 1995.
  25. Assessment of Opportunities and Considerations for Palestinian-Israeli Cooperation. J. Montville, J. Winkler, A. Marshal, D. Garner, M. Wihelm, M. Abu-Nimer, and H. Merwe.DAI (Development Alternative Incorporation), Bethesda, Maryland, 1992.
  26. Masuliaty (My Responsibility), Ilham Nasser and Mohammed Abu-Nimer . The Institute for Education for Co-Existence Between Arabs and Jews in Israel, Jerusalem, 1986. (Arabic).
  27. “Share Space, Defy the Wall” Common Ground News Service. 4 December 2008 Arabic translation on December 18, 2008.
  28. “Israelis, Palestinians must promote peace culture” News Day. July 1, 2007.
  29. “Nonviolent Voices in Israel and Palestine.” Policy Brief #9, June 2002. The Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  30. “Where are all the Moderates?” Newsday, April 14, 2002.
  31. “Peace Education Under Occupation.” Paper presented at George Mason University. Human Development Program on: Education under Occupation. November 2006.
  32. “Interfaith Peacebuilding in Israel-Palestine: From Sacred to Political.” International Studies Association (ISA). Hawaii, March 4, 2005.
  33. “Reconciliation and Justice: Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel.” Annual Conference of International Studies Association, New Orleans, March 2002.
  34. “Palestine: USA Policy towards Palestinian Authority in Post September 11.” Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, In Multiple Voices Conference, April 2002.
  35. “Reconciliation and Coexistence Between Arabs and Jews in Israel: Challenges and Possibilities.” Annual Conference of the Association of Israeli Studies, American University, Washington DC. May 2001.
  36. “Palestinians in Israel: Between Separation and Assimilation.” Middle East Studies Association annual conference, Orlando, Florida, November, 2000.
  37. “Arabs and Jews in Israel in a Crossroad: Assimilation, Separation, or Pluralism.” American Political Science Association Annual Conference, Washington, DC, 2000.
  38. “Arab-Jewish Dialogue In Israel.” Special Forum for Truman Institute Fellows, Jerusalem, May 2000.
  39. “Israeli-Palestinian Education for Peace: New Challenges in a New Century.” Middle East Studies Association annual conference, San Francisco, November 1997.
  40. “Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel: The Coexistence Field.” National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council annual meeting, New York, June 1995 (invited and published in the NJCRAC report).
  41. “Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel in the Aftermath of an Israeli-Palestinian Settlement.” Association for Israel Studies annual meeting, Gratz College, Philadelphia, June 1994.
  42. “Conflict Resolution Models between Arabs and Jews in Israel: A Case of Control or Change?” Middle East Studies Association, Portland, October 1992.
  43. “Intervention Models of Conflict Resolution in Arab-Jewish Relations.” Association for Israel Studies, University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 1992.
  44. “The Intifada as a Step Toward Conflict Resolution.” Conference of the Consortium for Peace Research, Education, and Development, Denver, Colorado, Sept. 1989.
  45. “Impacts of the Palestinian Uprising on Women.” George Mason University Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 1989.
  46. “The Battle Over Sacred Sites in Palestine/Israel: Between Fuel for War and Gestures for Peace. Peace & Policy issue # 17 (protecting the Sacred, Creating Peace in Asia Pacific, (March 2013).
  47. Reconciliation in The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Position Paper For Israeli-Palestinian Bereaved Families Forum For Peace And Reconciliation, 2013.
  48. “To Make Peace is to Forgive.” Blog. http://peaceoneday.org/blog , 9/21/2013
  49. Religion and Peace in Israel-Palestine: Does it Need a Miracle? Seven Annual conference, “religion, conflict and peacebuilding” University of Utah Press. (Feb 22, 013).
  50. Discussant, The Palestinian People and the Political Economy of De-development, ISA annual convention 2013.

 

Reconciliation and Forgiveness

 

  1. Reconciliation, Coexistence, and Justice: Theory and Practice. (Ed.) New York: Rowman & Little Field, 2001.
  2. Positive Approaches for Peace. (Eds.) Cynthia Sampson. Mohammed Abu-Nimer. Claudia Liebler. Washington DC: PACT publications, 2003.
  3. “We Make Friends with Our Enemies.” Yale Israel Journal, Special Issue on Israel Palestine Elections, 2006.
  4. “Liberation through Responsibility.” In; No Enemy to Conquer: Forgiveness in an Unforgiving World. By: Michael Henderson. Waco Texas: Baylor University Press, 2008, (p133-139).
  5. “The Role of Religious Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies: From Withdrawal to Forgiveness.” Peacebuilding in Traumatized Societies. In Barry Hart (Ed). New York: University Press of America, 2008. (p.239-261).
  6. “Reconciliation and Justice in Arab-Jewish Dialogue in Israel: Potential and Challenges”. Reconciliation, Justice, and Coexistence: Theory and Practice. Mohammed Abu-Nimer (Ed.) New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001.
  7. “Solution without Muslims will backfire”, Daily Mirror Sri Lnka Newspaper. Also appeared in Community Portal of Sri Lanka Muslims. 9.17/2007.
  8. “We Make Peace With Our Enemies.” Al Ahram Weekly, 16-22, 2006, Issue No. 786;
  9. “Reconciliation and Justice: Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel.” Annual Conference of International Studies Association, New Orleans, March 2002.
  10. “Reconciliation and Coexistence Between Arabs and Jews in Israel: Challenges and Possibilities.” Annual Conference of the Association of Israeli Studies, American University, Washington DC. May 2001.
  11. Teaching for forgiveness in Arab Schools: Comparison of between countries and religions. Presented at the American Education Research Association annual meeting, San Francisco.

 

Peacemaking/Conflict Resolution

 

  1. A Shared Future: Local Capacities for Peace in Community Development. Michelle Garred. (Ed) with Mohammed Abu-Nimer. CA: World Vision. 2006.
  2. “Bridging Conflict Resolution and Human Rights: Promises and Challenges.” In: Human Rights and Conflict. (Eds.). Julie Mertus and Jeff Helsing (Eds.) Washington DC: USIP April 2006.
  3. “Toward the Theory and Practice of Positive Approaches to Peacebuilding.” In: Positive Approaches for Peace. (Eds.) Cynthia Sampson. Mohammed Abu-Nimer. Claudia Liebler. Washington DC: PACT publications, 2003.
  4. Conflict Resolution Methods. In Mossawa Center Newsletter. September 2009.
  5. Final Assessment Report (with Kevin Avruch). Review of the Coexistence Master Program at Brandeis University October 2008.
  6. Final Assessment Report of People Forum in Sri Lanka. AED. June, 2007.
  7. Final Assessment of OTI (Office of Transitional Initiative) Peacebuilding and Development Project in Sri Lanka: 2003-2007. Social Impact May, 2007.
  8. “Integrating Peacebuilding and Development in Area Development Program of Sarangani, Mindanao. An Evaluation report for World Vision Foundation, Philippines. 2004.
  9. “We the Peacemakers: Teach-In to Congress for Middle East Peace.” In Tikkon Magazine: A critique of Politics, Culture, and Society. July/August 2004.
  10. “Graduate Peace Education Curriculum.” Designed (with Mary King) a proposed peace education graduate program, United Nations Peace University. Costa Rica. April, 2003.
  11. Peacebuilding in Development Context: CRS in Morocco.” A feasibility study, August 2000.
  12. “Intercommunity and Intracommunity Peacebuilding Projects in Sri Lanka.”A special report for CARE and IMTD, 1999.
  13. Introduction to Conflict Resolution, Mohammed Abu-Nimer and Tala’t Kaisi. Lebanese Center for Public Policy Studies, 1999 (Arabic). (A manual and edited book: translated and compiled).
  14. “Non-Western Approaches to Conflict Resolution: Lessons from A Workshop in Gaza.” COPRED Peace Chronicle, Vol. 20, NO. 1, March 1995.
  15. Conflict Resolution Skills: A Training Manual, Part 1 and 2. Developed for the U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) Under the: Community Partnership Training Program, Silver Spring, Maryland, 1993. (Community Partnership in Office for Substance Abuse and Prevention).
  16. A Handbook For Social Education Activities. Abu-Nimer, M. and Nasser, I., (Translated from Hebrew to Arabic) (By: Abraham Himo, 1985), 1988.
  17. “Integrating Conflict Resolution & Diversity Approaches: A Training Model for Intercultural & Interreligious Peacebuilding.” Mohammed Abu-Nimer and Vernie Davis. NCPCR, June 2001.
  18. “Conflict Resolution and Democracy: The Missing Link.” Annual Conference of World Movement for Democracy. Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 2000.
  19. “Culture in Conflict Resolution Training.” Annual conference of Consortium for Peace Research, Education, and Development and Peace Studies Association, Sienna College, Albany, NY, April 1999.
  20. “Diversity and Conflict Resolution Training.” Annual conference of the Consortium for Peace Research, Education, and Development and the Peace Studies Association, North Newton, Kansas, April 1998.
  21. “Israeli-Palestinian Education for Peace: New Challenges in a New Century.” Middle East Studies Association annual conference, San Francisco, November 1997.
  22. “Conflict Resolution Training Workshops in the Middle East: Lessons to be Learned.” Washington Negotiation Group, John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1997.
  23. “North American Model of Conflict Resolution: Critique and Adaptation.” National Conference on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution, St. Paul. Minn., June 1995.
  24. “Can Western Conflict Resolution Approaches Be Applied in a Middle Eastern Context?” American Sociology Association annual meeting, Los Angeles, August 1994.
  25. “Conflict Resolution and Intergroup Relations.” Second Conflict Resolution Conference in the Middle East, sponsored by Search for Common Ground, Antalya, Turkey, November 1993 (invited and a summary of the paper appeared in SCG newsletter).
  26. “Conflict Resolution and Islam: Some Conceptual Questions.” Fundamentalism Project Conference, sponsored by the American Academy of Art and Science, Washington, DC, February 1993 (invited and used to publish a working paper on the subject).
  27. “Eastern and Western Models of Negotiation.” Washington Interest in Negotiation, John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1993 (invited).
  28. “Conflict Resolution Models between Arabs and Jews in Israel: A Case of Control or Change?” Middle East Studies Association, Portland, October 1992.
  29. “Dispute Resolution in a Middle Eastern Community.” Middle East Studies Association annual meeting, Portland, Oregon, October 1992.
  30. “Intervention Models of Conflict Resolution in Arab-Jewish Relations.” Association for Israel Studies, University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 1992.
  31. “Cross Cultural Conflict Resolution: Exploring Preliminary Steps.” Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution, Washington, DC, November 1991.
  32. “The Nonviolent Aspects of the Uprising.” A paper presented at the Society for the Study of Social Problems Conference, Washington, DC, August 1990.
  33. “The Intifada as a Step Toward Conflict Resolution.” Conference of the Consortium for Peace Research, Education, and Development, Denver, Colorado, Sept. 1989.
  34. Reflections on the Field of Conflict Resolution.” International Journal on Conflict Engagement and Resolution. vol. 1 (2), 2013. Pp.163-187.
  35. “Religion and Peacebuilding.” In: Handbook on Peacebuilding (Ed.) Roger Mac Ginty. New York: Routledge, 2013.
  36. “Basic Human Needs: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice.” In: Conflict Resolution and Human Needs: Linking Theory and Practice. Kevin Avruch and Chris, Mitchell (Eds.). New York: Routledge . 2013.

 

U.S Foreign Policy

 

  1. “Pax Americana and the Bush Doctrine in the Middle East: An Arab Post-Iraq War Perspective” in War and Border Crossings. (ed.) Peter French Rowman and Littlefield , MD. 2005.
  2. “Another Voice Against the War” The Arab World Geographer Vol. 4, no.2, 2001 (pp. 15-18).
  3. “September 11 and the Palestinian Reaction: No Win.” (With Amal Khoury) In Multiple Voices. Notre Dame University. Scott Appleby and Abdul Rasheid Omar (Forthcoming).
  4. The Muslim World Reacts to September 11. History Behind The Headlines. The Origins of Conflicts Worldwide. Vol. 5. (Ed) (With Amal Khoury and Lynn Kunkle). Nancy Matuzak. New York: Thompson Gale. (pp. 209-244).
  5. “We the Peacemakers: Teach-In to Congress for Middle East Peace.” In Tikkon Magazine: A critique of Politics, Culture, and Society. July/August 2004.
  6. “Who Are these Crazy People who Support Saddam?” Abu-Nimer, M. and Robinson Victor. Capitol Area Peace Studies Chronicle Vo. 2, No. 8. Jan. 1991.
  7. “Americans glimpse the ‘real’ Iran.” by Mohammed Abu-Nimer and Ayse Kadayifci Common Ground News Service. 18 December 2007.
  8. “Another Voice Against the War” International Studies Association, Newsletter December 2001.
  9. Discussant on the Panel: Islamic-Western Relationships: Challenges and Implications for National and Global Securities. International Studies Association (ISA). Hawaii, March 3, 2005.
  10. “Palestine: USA Policy towards Palestinian Authority in Post September 11.” Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, In Multiple Voices Conference, April 2002.

 

Islamic Thought

 

  1. Modern Islamic Thought: Dynamic, Not Static. (Eds.) Said Abdul Aziz, Mohammed Abu-Nimer, and Meena Sharify-Funk. New York. Routledge Press. 2006.
  2. “Federalism in Islam: Principles and Values.” In: Federalism Tool for Conflict Management in multicultural societies with regard to the conflicts in the Middle East Thomas Fleiner. The Institute of Federalism Fribourg, Switzerland.
  3. “Islam Fighting the Darkness within.” Peace & Conflict Monitor, UN-University for Peace. December 15, 2005.
  4. “Forgiveness in the Arab and Islamic Contexts: Between Theology and Practice.” Journal of Religious Ethics, 2013. 41,(3). 474-494.
    Bios:

 

Dr. Alaa Nasief

 

Dr. Alaa Nasief is the founder and General Manager of Hadara, a consulting form that aims to promote educational and individual excellence and positive social change through training, research, and empowerment programs. Over the last ten years, Dr. Nasief has been active in implementing social development programs in various sectors of Saudi society. Her extensive academic and professional background is in developing community service programs for youth, as well as tackling various social issues related to education, curriculum studies, and girls/women. In 2003, Dr. Nasief pioneered an innovative leadership program for Saudi girls that focuses on teamwork, discipline, social skills, and spirituality in order to expose them to new ideas and ways of thinking. This program, which runs every summer, has been highly successful in producing leaders who are active in both their communities and other fields. In 2007, Dr. Nasief was the Associate Dean at Jeddah’s College of Business Administration, a post that put her on the pulse of youth issues. She was also the Country Program Manager for the Women in Technology program that seeks to educate and enable unprivileged Saudi females, and a coordinating member of Bonyan, an organization for volunteer and community services. Dr. Nasief has a Master’s in Education and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies, both from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

 

Dr. Soleman H. Abu-Bader

 

Dr. Soleman H. Abu-Bader earned his PhD from the University of Utah; MSW, Augsburg College. Abu-Bader is a professor of social work at Howard University and has worked as a social work practitioner and researcher. He is the author of several empirical research articles that focus on the elderly, mental health, welfare, and organizational behavior among Arab and Muslim Americans. Abu-Bader has also published two books on bivariate and multivariate statistical methods: Using Statistical Methods in Social Science Research (2011) and Advanced and Multivariate Statistical Methods for Social Science Research (2010).

 

Conference Reports:

Islamic Traditions and Nonviolence: Responding to Contemporary Changes

This one-day conference on Islamic Traditions of Peace and Nonviolence focused on linking theological and religious interpretations of peace and nonviolence with tangible practices at the community, as well as, policy making levels. More specifically, the conference offered space for critical reflection on these and many other questions:

The Dialogue of Islam and Peacemaking in Iran

In October 2007, the Salam Institute for Peace and Justice and the United States Institute for Peace partnered together to sponsor a seven member delegation of Muslim American Islamic scholars to travel to Iran.  Over the course of the ten day trip, the delegation traveled to Tehran, Qum and Isfahan to engage in conversations with various human rights organizations, civil society groups, non-governmental organizations and religious leaders.  Throughout the trip, key observations were made by the delegation concerning the escalation of violence, internal political turmoil and the importance of the role of nonviolence and peace and conflict resolution in the country.

Comprehensive Report of the Proceedings of the Second Annual Muslim Peacebuilding, Justice and Interfaith Dialogue Conference

In order to continue its efforts to enhance the peacebuilding capacity of Muslim peacebuilding actors and to provide a platform to continue the discussion that started with the First Annual Conference, Salam Institute and ISNA held the Second Annual Conference of MPJID on May 5th-6th 2007. This conference aimed to create an opportunity for Muslim scholars and practitioners to convene to discuss and clarify main concepts and approaches to peacebuilding, conflict resolution, human rights, democratization and development rooted in the Islamic tradition; to contribute to effective policy development in the Muslim world in the fields of governance, conflict resolution, and peacebuilding; and too provide a platform for Muslim Peacebuilding practitioners to share their experiences on the ground with the wider community of Muslim and non-Muslim scholars and practitioners in order to contribute to theory building and practice of conflict resolution in the Muslim world.

Comprehensive Report of the Proceedings of the First Annual Muslim Peacebuilding, Justice and Interfaith Dialogue Conference

Sponsored by the Salam Institute for Peace and Justice, the Islamic Society of North America, the Conflict Transformation Grant and Fuller Theological Society and the Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace at American University The first annual Muslim Peacebuilding, Justice and Interfaith Dialogue Conference was a unique event, bringing together various members of the Islamic peacebuilding community interested at exploring the changing face of Islam in American society since September 11, 2001. The Conference aimed to explore the dynamics and intersection of Islamic peacebuilding, conflict resolution and interfaith dialogue in the Muslim world today.

Training and Dialogue Reports:

Imam Leadership & Conflict Resolution Training

This two day training led by Mohammed Abu-Nimer, Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana and Salam Institute co-founder Amr Abdalla provided training to Imams in the areas of Islamic understanding of peace, Islamic principles and values of conflict resolution, interfaith dialogue and development and how these principles and values can be applied to current day conflicts.

American Muslim-Christian Conflict Resolution Training and Dialogue Series

In each of these three cities, leaders from both religious communities came together for an open and constructive discussion focused on garnering a more comprehensive understanding of each faith as well as building awareness and understanding regarding each faiths’ approach to peace.

Salam Newsletters:

To read the Salam Newsletters, click here

Other Salam Publications:

Faith-Based Peacebuilding: Mapping and Analysis of Christians, Muslim and Multi-Faith Actors
Tsjeard Bouth, S. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana, Mohammed Abu-Nimer. Released by the Salam Institute for Peace & Justice and the Clingendael Institute. November 2005.

This desk study analyzes 27 Christian, Muslim and multi-faith organizations that are working on peace-building in conflict situations. By studying how they operate as peacebuilders, the study aims to shed more light on the peace-building potential of faith-based organizations. It particularly aims to advise donors on how they can deal with faith-based peacebuilding in policy. Based on this first and limited analysis, the authors came to the following findings, donor recommendations and suggestions for follow-up study.

Muslim Peacebuilding Actors in the Balkans, Horn of Africa and the Great Lakes Region
Compiled by the Salam Institute for Peace & Justice for the Clingendael Institute. May 2005.
This report maps out Muslim peacebuilding actors in Africa and the Balkans, describes and analyzes their activities in terms of their contribution to peacebuilding processes in their regions.